Sunday, February 3, 2013

New Skirts and Fitting Issues

I love skirts.  There.  I said it!  I could make skirts all day long and I have just completed another three - two have made it for this quick shoot.

The first up is a straight skirt that is slightly pegged at the hem (Simplicity 7623).  Rather than put a vent in the back, I extended the bottom hem and centre back seam (similar to a godet) which gives me the circumference I need for walking ease.  Oh, and it is flippy - and I love flippy hems!  The waistband is elasticated, the skirt is lined and has a lace trim to the hem.  The fabric is a super drapey crepe and is matt, no shine at all, and will see lots of wear!



Next up is a fitted tartan skirt made from a length of Royal Stewart (I think) wool/poly fabric that I have had for a gazillion years.  I put in an invisible zip - in red, call me a rebel - and the skirt is lined with a lace hem.  I sewed the lining down along the vent so that it does not show through.

I matched up the checks up horizontally, and should have paid a little more attention to the vertical as well.  Ho hum.  Next time!  I wore this to work last week and received lots of lovely compliments.  Very nice indeed!



And so on to fitting.  Following on from yesterdays post about a muslin that I had sewn up that I thought did not look flattering, I received an offer of posting the photos so that suggestions could be made by the lovely Carolyn to improve the fit.  Well, who am I to turn down that kind of offer?  So here we are.

The pattern has already been adjusted to account for an FBA as well as a sway back.  From the underarm to the hem, there is no shaping - just a straight seam.





This side view (above) shows that my body does not actually go 'in' much more than the outline of the muslin.

I also thought that I would show you how much fabric that there is to 'pinch'.  Er, not very much!!!  And when I sat down, I kind of filled out the rest of the fabric . . . . just keeping it real!!

And finally - this is how a finished version could look with a cute RTW cashmere cardigan, which frankly, isn't bad!  The length, I would probably shorten it somewhat and I did not put a zip in this version as I can just about slip it over my head.  'Real' versions would certainly have an invisible zip!

Well, I would appreciate any comments - I think that the front view bothers me most.  And thanks, in anticipation!

13 comments :

  1. Love the skirts - how good is it to be able to whip these up on a whim!
    Can't wait to see what hints Carolyn passes on to you - I don't think it will take much tweaking to get it how you want...J

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  2. Would you consider vertical front darts? Or will it affect the pattern of the fabric?

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    1. I hadn't thought of vertical darts - I've only just learned about FBA's! The fabric is a tiny herringbone, so those darts would not cause any issues. Thanks for the suggestion!

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  3. Nix the darts as a fat girl I HATE darts in my abdomen! When you're skinny I think they accent and highlight - I don't want to highlight my fat. Slice that sucker up the front from right below the bust to the hemline and overlap the extra. Baste it closed and sit down in it. If there is enough space to sit, you're good. That was my first thought. My second is that I indent my side seams just a little bit to aid with the illusion that I have a waist cause really I don't. However, illusion is everything.

    Then definitely take in the extra at your underarms. Do that before you slice up the front though. Try that and see if it works. Don't be afraid to take the basting out and re-baste, it might take a try or two to get it right. After you get it to fit right, take out the side seams and either use the muslin to make a new pattern or use the muslin as a pattern. Personally I would make a new pattern.

    Now I don't know if this is in any of the fitting books but this is what I'd do. I'd love to see some pics afterwards and I hope this helps!

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    1. Thanks for the comments - I will certainly try them out and let you know how I get on!

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  4. Oh do what Carolyn says and then show us another muslin. Also - the length will help, it needs to be shorter, just at the think part under your knees - and don't tell me you don't have it - because I have fat knees and I'm thinner just under. It's all about illusion. I also think there's too much fabric in the front at the side seams - that's what that funny pleat is about. But I think Carolyn's slide and overlap might take care of that. Good luck and have fun!! g

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    1. Indeed I will. I think that length will make a difference - I was going to shorten it . . . but wanted to get in front of the camera before Paul (Hubby) lost interest! Oh, and shoes - these are my 'driving shoes' and not very attractive!! As my school report used to say 'Could do better'!

      Will keep you updated . . . . .

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  5. What fun to read the comments. Great ideas and can't wait to see pictures. I love the plaid skirt!

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  6. Wow, Carolyn's advice is golden! I cannot wait to see further progress in how you get along with creating your perfect sheath dress pattern :)

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  7. your skirt really looks lovely and the sheath dress is coming along lovely

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  8. What great skirts! I am firmly of the opinion that everyone needs a red tartan skirt in her wardrobe.

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  9. I agree with gMarie's comment about a shorter length, even in skirts. I know you like an elasticized waist because it is easier to construct, but without darting, a waistband and a zipper you wind up with extra fabric between the waist and hip which makes you look bigger than you really are. I read, somewhere, that you could wrap the tape measure around your waist or hip and sit down to determine how much ease you actually need. To get around that I have a four gore slightly A-line skirt pattern that I use quite a bit and it does not need a vent. I use Nancy Zeiman's waistband treatment which uses elastic for the waistband interfacing. You cut your waistband the size you need and the elastic is cut to length after you stitch on the waistband and try on the skirt.
    Palmer and Plesch recommend fitting the back first. It looks like you need to curve in the center back seam at the waist and back out just a bit at the hips. This will mean you cannot cut on the fold, but that is OK. Carolyn's comment about tapering in the side seams is a good one. Sandra Betzina says it is better to do this taper (in and then out to the hipline) above your actual waistline so that you don't have to go over a bump when you get to the hips.

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  10. Don't be afraid to show you have a waist (because you do go in there). Definately need some darts or equivelent to take out that excess fabric.
    Have you thought about making an empire line dress with a Vneck? I think it would really suit you.
    Your skirt and top combos remind me of some of the 1920's daywear stylings with the faked drop waist.

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